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do have a big disaster like sandy, we've almost always spent all the money because it was pretty easy to have a governor ask for a disaster and the president to declare it, and then the money is gone. fema primarily relied on the per capita damage indicator as the criteria rather than whether or not the local community really had the resources to deal with this on its own. there was no specific criteria in fema to decide at what point we paid various percentages up to 100% coming from the federal government, and the fema administrative costs from 1989 to 2011 had doubled. it had increased from 9% of every disaster to an average of 18% of every disaster. so g.a.o. recommended that we look -- do several things. that fema develop a methodology to more accurately assess what a jurisdiction was able to do, that we develop criteria to know when the federal government should accept all of the obligation, 100% of the adjusted cost, and that we implement new goals to track why these costs of administering disasters were going up so dramatically. so hopefully we can do that, we can look at the
"response activities for hurricane sandy" and replaces it with "purposes provided herein." a minor -- small verbal change. but response activities has unlimited meaning. this change does clarify that funds may be used to cover additional recovery and related costs connected to hurricane sandy. second it adds the phrase "to make grants" to clarify that the department of h.h.s. has specific grant-making authority for renovating, repairing and rebuilding nonfederal facilities involved in n.i.h. research. for example an academic center of excellence well known for its work particularly in cancer research will have the opportunity to rebuild. i recommend the support of this amendment. senator shelby has signed off on it. i believe it is not controversial. c.b.o. says it does not adversely -- it does not score at all. and i understand that the minority staff on labor-h.h.s. has also signed off on those changes. mr. president, that amendment too will be voted on tomorrow if not accepted. tonight we're just not accepting amendments and we're not voice voting them. i also want to note that we have t
for hurricane sandy victims. they're scheduled to vote on amendments to both measures and recess from 12:30 p.m. eastern to 12:15 eastern for party caucus meetings. live coverage on c-span2. and the house will return for legislative business on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern with votes expected beginning at 6:30. we'll have lye coverage when they return on c-span. >> congressional leaders will meet with president obama at the white house later today to talk about plans to avert the so-of called fiscal cliff. before the senate adjourned yesterday, majority leader harry reid and minority leader mitch mcconnell debated the fiscal cliff and talked about negotiations surrounding the tax hikes and automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect in a few days. this is about 5 minutes -- 15 minutes. >> madam president, you'll excuse me if i'm a little frustrated at the situation we find ourselves in, but last night president obama called myself and the speaker and maybe others from hawaii and asked if there was something we could do to avoid the fiscal cliff. i say i'm a little frustrated, because we've b
in sandy funds would be spent. don't you think you could put together a list of spending cuts that at least, at least includes robosquirrel? we're still waiting. why? because for democrats, apparently, every dollar in federal spending is sacred. once secured, it can't be cut. that's why we have got trillion-dollar deficits. the truth is until the president gets specific about cuts, nobody should trust democrats to put a dime in new revenue toward real deficit reduction or to stop their shakedown of the taxpayers at the top 2%. as one liberal lawmaker put it last week, that's just the beginning. when it comes to deficit deals, the taxpayers need to trust but verify. on cuts, that means specifics. and, mr. president, on an entirely different subject, as we enter the final weeks of the 112th congress, one of the toughest tasks for me is saying goodbye to colleagues who won't be with us at the start of the next congress. so i'd like to kick it off this morning by spending just a few minutes bragging on my long-time friend and neighbor to the north, senator dick lugar. let me just start by sayin
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4